Diane Mackie

Diane Mackie

Professor

Research Area

Social Psychology

Biography

After receiving my BA and MA from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, I worked (and also had great fun) as a research assistant for Willem Doise and Gabriel Mugny at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in 1979.  With the inspirational supervision of Joel Cooper, I received my MA and PhD in Social Psychology from Princeton University in 1984, and was hired by UCSB in the same year. The author of more than 150 articles and chapters on social influence and intergroup relations, I am also the co-author (with Eliot Smith, Indiana University, and Heather Claypool, Miami University of Ohio) of an introductory social psychology textbook, Social Psychology (4rd Edition, 2014).  A fellow of SESP, SPSP, APS, SPSSI, and AAAS, I have served as Associate Editor for Personality and Social Psychology Review, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, and Journal of Consumer Psychology, as well as on the editorial boards of many of our social psychology journals.  I am honored to have won several teaching awards, as well as the 1998 SPSSI Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Award. In gratitude for the fabulous work they do in promoting social psychology and social psychologists, I have served on multiple committees and taskforces for the Society of Experimental Social Psychology and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, of which I was President in 2017.

Research

I have pursued two distinct lines of research throughout my career. One of these focuses on intergroup relations, including stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination, and particularly on the impact of affect and emotion on these processes. My other area of research interest is social influence, especially the impact of social and affective processes on evaluations, attitudes, and norms (conformity).   Given my training in both American and European social psychology, integrating the psychological with the social has been a driving force of my work on both topics.  Ongoing work in my lab includes, for example, projects on the nature of social emotions and their role in prejudice and discrimination, including in different kinds of groups; the role of culture and ingroup identification in generating group emotions, justifying ingroup actions, and explaining outgroup derogation; the role of familiarity, affect, and emotion in persuasion; and the often implicit influence other peoples’ thoughts, feelings, and behaviors have on our own, especially those of other people just like us.

Selected Publications

Mackie, D. M., & Smith, E. R. (2018). Intergroup emotions theory: Production, regulation, and modification of group-based emotions. In J. M. Olson (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology; advances in experimental social psychology (pp. 1-69, Chapter vii, 299 Pages) Elsevier Academic Press, San Diego, CA.

Maitner, A. T., Mackie, D. M., Pauketat, J. V. T., & Smith, E. R. (2017). The impact of culture and identity on emotional reactions to insults. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(6), 892-913.

Smith, E. R., & Mackie, D. M. (2016). Influence from representations of others’ responses: Social priming meets social influence. Current Opinion in Psychology, 12, 22-25. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2016.04.012

Calachini, J. Moons, W.G. & Mackie, D.M. (2016).  Angry expressions induce extensive processing of persuasive appeals. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 64, 88-98.

Claypool, H.M., Mackie, D.M. & Garcia-Marques, T. (2015).  Fluency and attitudes:  Effects on evaluation and processing. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 9, 370-82.