News

October 24, 2016

A new study by UCSB social psychologist Brenda Major suggests the reason many white Americans support Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) — In this election year of unprecedented acrimony, one of the most polarizing issues of all is rooted in what’s typically considered a national strength: diversity.

But as it turns out, according to UC Santa Barbara psychologist Brenda Major, not all Americans value the country’s multicultural ethos.

Related Links
October 13, 2016

Study by PBS researchers Eom, Kim, & Sherman find culture a significant factor in motivating eco-friendly behaviors.

Related Links
October 12, 2016

PBS Professor Mary Hegarty, SAGE Fellow Margaret Tarampi and PBS honors student Nahal Heydari show that framing spatial tasks as social eliminates gender differences.

Media coverage of the study includes articles in Huffington Post and Education Weekly.

Related Links
October 04, 2016

When computer scientist, bitcoin expert and noted hacker Emin Gün Sirer gave a public talk as a visiting scholar at UC Santa Barbara, the room was packed with engineers, rapt at attention. No surprise there, except maybe when considering the event’s host: the campus’s SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind.

Related Links
September 28, 2016

Many women report forgetfulness and changes in memory as they transition to menopause. But studies that target participants who are 65 and older do not account for cognitive changes that may take place decades earlier in a woman’s life.

By studying women ages 45 to 55, investigators at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have found that reproductive stage, not simply chronological age, may contribute to changes in memory and brain function. Their findings will be published Wednesday in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Related Links
September 15, 2016

A UC Santa Barbara researcher studying how the brain uses perception of the environment to guide action has a new understanding of the neural circuits responsible for transforming sensation into movement.

“Mapping perception to a future action seems simple,” UCSB neuroscientist Michael Goard. “We do it all the time when we see a traffic light and use that information to guide our later motor action. However, how these associations are mapped across time in the brain is not well understood.”

Related Links
August 17, 2016

Brain scans of musician Sting give Professor Scott Grafton insight into how the rocker forges musical connections in his mind.

Related Links
August 11, 2016

UC Santa Barbara Professor Zoe Liberman finds infants learn about food preferences — what’s good, what’s bad and who will eat what — in a social context

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) — If you want your baby to love broccoli, you better love it, too, because that tiny human is watching you to learn which foods are good and bad. That’s one of the takeaways in anew paper by a UC Santa Barbara researcher who investigated the way infants reason in socially smart ways about food.

Related Links
Jonathan Schooler
July 14, 2016

UC Santa Barbara’s newest research center might well be its most focused. The Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at UCSB has opened The Center for Mindfulness & Human Potential (CMHP), which is dedicated to advancing interdisciplinary research into mindfulness and neuroplasticity. The center — which will be directed by longstanding collaborators Jonathan Schooler, Michael Mrazek and Dawa Tarchin Phillips — aims to use the best science, education and technology to advance scientific understanding and improve lives.

Related Links
July 12, 2016

When children learn how to tie their shoelaces, they do so in discrete steps — making a loop or tugging at the lace. Through repetition, these individual motions merge into elemental actions called “chunks” that remain so organized even after extensive practice.

Related Links

Pages