News 2014

December 19, 2014

The article “What Memory Is” by Psychological & Brain Sciences Professor Stanley B. Klein is the inaugural feature in the CrossWires initiative from the neuroscience journal WIREs Cognitive Science (Wiley Publishers). In CrossWires, a new, potentially controversial theory is presented and comments are invited and solicited.

December 05, 2014

Rep. Lois Capps, D-Santa Barbara, announced Friday that researchers at UCSB received a National Science Foundation grant to study the psychological response to the threat of Ebola.

The project, titled “RAPID: The Psychology of Fear: Cultural Orientation and Response to Ebola Threat,” received $128,202.

Ebola is one of the deadliest contagious diseases to emerge into the public consciousness in recent years, and it has been a source of much fear globally, despite the fact that the actual risk of contagion is quite low in many parts of the world.

Related Links
November 04, 2014

According to the conventional wisdom, American politics and politicians are more polarized now than they have been since the Civil War, reflecting a growing chasm between Democrats and Republicans. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong? There’s no question that politicians are more divided; just look at their voting records. But what if the polarization of politicians reflects a common mistake about Americans — a widely held but false belief that Democratic and Republican voters are more divided than they actually are?

Related Links
October 01, 2014

An innovative research replication initiative has generated results that have important implications for eyewitness memory. The project confirms earlier findings that asking witnesses to provide a verbal description of a suspect can impair their ability to select that suspect from a lineup — the so-called “verbal overshadowing” effect.

Related Links
September 18, 2014

Deep and meaningful relationships play a vital role in overall well-being. Past research has shown that individuals with supportive and rewarding relationships have better mental health, higher levels of subjective well-being and lower rates of morbidity and mortality. A paper published in Personality and Social Psychology Review provides an important perspective on thriving through relationships, emphasizes two types of support that relationships provide, and illuminates aspects where further study is necessary.

Related Links
August 29, 2014

Psychology Researchers at UCSB and Griffith University in Australia identify origin and purpose of the facial expression for anger

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) — The next time you get really mad, take a look in the mirror. See the lowered brow, the thinned lips and the flared nostrils? That’s what social scientists call the “anger face,” and it appears to be part of our basic biology as humans.

Related Links
August 21, 2014

New UCSB assistant professor Kyle Ratner received the award for research conducted while he was a Ph. D. student at NYU.

Kyle G. Ratner, May Ling Halim, and David Amodio. Perceived stigmatization, ingroup pride, and immune and endocrine activity: Evidence from a community sample of Black and Latina women. (2013). Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 82- 91.

https://www.psych.ucsb.edu/people/faculty/ratner

August 21, 2014

Prof. Grafton's research featured in Convergence, the magazine of engineering and the sciences at UCSB.

http://convergence.ucsb.edu/article/delicate-mystery-brain-trauma

Pages